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Write n essay that explains how the foreshadowing in “The Monkey’s

Question Write n essay that explains how the foreshadowing in “The Monkey’s Paw” by W. W. Jacobs creates tension, suspense, or both. Your essay will have an introduction paragraph, several body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. The ideas in your essay must be linked by transitions.Make sure you show a good understanding of what foreshadowing, tension, and suspense mean. Also make sure you can pick out examples of these elements in “The Monkey’s Paw” so that you can support your essay’s claim with evidence.Your essay should include the following elements: -A claim about how the foreshadowing in W. W. Jacobs’s story creates tension or suspense -An introduction paragraph, at least two body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph -Evidence from the story that supports your claim -Transitions that link words and ideasYou should have completed a draft of this assignment in the activity before this one. If you haven’t done so, go back and complete that activity now.Ask yourself these questions as you revise: -Have I proved that I understand the relationship between foreshadowing and tension or suspense? Does my essay include several examples of both? -Does my introduction paragraph include my claim? Does it grab the reader’s attention and preview the evidence that I use to support my claim? -Do body paragraphs all provide evidence from the story that supports my claim? Do I make it clear how the evidence is related to the claim? -Does my conclusion paragraph remind the reader of my claim and evidence? Does it leave the reader with something to think about? -Do transitions link ideas? Do they make the essay easy to read and understand?Use this rubric to determine how well you’re meeting the criteria for the assignment.

Get Answer Required Resources Read/review the following resources for this activity: Textbook: pp. 63-91, and review pp. 266-270LessonLink (PDF):

Question Get Answer Required Resources Read/review the following resources for this activity: Textbook: pp. 63-91, and review pp. 266-270LessonLink (PDF): Proposal Template with ExampleMinimum of 2 scholarly sources (one supporting, one opposing)Apply the following writing resources to your assignment:Link (multimedia presentation): Citing References in Text (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)Link (website): APA Citation and Writing (Links to an external site.)InstructionsThe goal of an argument research proposal is to create a working argument thesis statement and a basic research plan that considers context, audience, and purpose and that presents potential sources that support and run counter to your stance.Keep in mind that rather than being an outline or structural plan for your essay, this proposal should ground you in the scholarly conversation, should offer direction for research needs, and should give your professor ample focused material viable for providing effective feedback before the drafting process.Access the Proposal Template and complete the six required sections:Narrowed TopicResearch QuestionClaimRationale and Research PlanReview of Differing Viewpoint Sources via Synthesis MatrixReference PageFor an example proposal and development techniques, refer to your textbook reading for the week.Writing Requirements (APA format)Length: 1-1.5 pages (not including title page

Hi there, I need help doing a poetry analysis, I already did some

Question Hi there, I need help doing a poetry analysis, I already did some questions but I’m confused on some of these questions. I’ve attached the poem below and questions. T – Titlea) what is the denotation of the word(s) or phrase(s) in the title?b) what is the connotation of the word(s) or phrase(s) in the title?F – Factsa) What’s the summary of the poem?b) what can be determined about the speaker and/or other characters and the setting?T – Techniquesa) what poetic and/or literary techniques are being used in the poem? and what supports this in the poem? (eg. Symbols/Metaphor)A – Attitude(s)a) What’s the tone of the author?b) What’s the mood/atmosphere created by the author’s choice of diction?S – Shift(s)a) are there any change(s) in speaker, setting, tone, etc.?I – Ideaa) What are the controlling idea(s)/theme(s) of the poem?Thanks so much! I really appreciate your help. 🙂

Get Answer

-What makes this method of organization effective?

-Dillard uses an extended metaphor, comparing us and

EnglishQuestion Get Answer

-What makes this method of organization effective?

-Dillard uses an extended metaphor, comparing us and our planet to the wandering mangrove islands. Think of another metaphor you could use to describe the condition of life on our planet and explain it. -Make a list of at least three techniques Dillard uses in her essay that sojourners by annie dillard essay

Lord of the Flies questions! 1. All of the following are character traits of Piggy except

Question Lord of the Flies questions! 1. All of the following are character traits of Piggy except A: he values an orderly societyB: he has good ideas for RalphC: he seeks new experiencesD: he has asthma2. Why doesn’t Jack care about being rescued?A: Jack enjoys being a hunter and leader on the island.B: Jack doesn’t remember his home.C: Jack is afraid of what his parents will do to him at home.D: Jack knows he will be sent to prison in England.3. Judging from the themes of Lord of the Flies and what happens on the island, what was author William Golding’s main purpose?A:to show that adults are necessary for children’s well-beingB:to show that all people are capable of evilC: to write a gripping adventure story D: to show the dangers of being on an island​

please respond to the following email. From: Rob Dipchan, Manager, Forensic Auditing

Question please respond to the following email. From: Rob Dipchan, Manager, Forensic Auditing To: Karamveer SidhuDate: March 9, 2016Subject: Request for information about writing/editing softwareHi Karamveer:As we discussed at the last meeting, the grammar and spell checker on MS Word does not meet our needs. It fails to fully proofread our internal and external correspondence, which has resulted in many embarrassing errors. Therefore, we are thinking of investing in an online spell and grammar checker. Could you please do little preliminary research on a couple of these products? I’d like to know which ones have the better reviews and how much they cost. Any other information you can find out would be appreciated. Could you please get back to me by next Thursday, as I’d like to go over your findings at the Friday meeting.Thanks,Rob

Write n essay that explains how the foreshadowing in “The Monkey’s

Question Get Answer Write n essay that explains how the foreshadowing in “The Monkey’s Paw” by W. W. Jacobs creates tension, suspense, or both. Your essay will have an introduction paragraph, several body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. The ideas in your essay must be linked by transitions.Make sure you show a good understanding of what foreshadowing, tension, and suspense mean. Also make sure you can pick out examples of these elements in “The Monkey’s Paw” so that you can support your essay’s claim with evidence.Your essay should include the following elements: -A claim about how the foreshadowing in W. W. Jacobs’s story creates tension or suspense -An introduction paragraph, at least two body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph -Evidence from the story that supports your claim -Transitions that link words and ideasYou should have completed a draft of this assignment in the activity before this one. If you haven’t done so, go back and complete that activity now.Ask yourself these questions as you revise: -Have I proved that I understand the relationship between foreshadowing and tension or suspense? Does my essay include several examples of both? -Does my introduction paragraph include my claim? Does it grab the reader’s attention and preview the evidence that I use to support my claim? -Do body paragraphs all provide evidence from the story that supports my claim? Do I make it clear how the evidence is related to the claim? -Does my conclusion paragraph remind the reader of my claim and evidence? Does it leave the reader with something to think about? -Do transitions link ideas? Do they make the essay easy to read and understand?Use this rubric to determine how well you’re meeting the criteria for the assignment.

Based on the article “The Death of English (LOL): In an experiment,

Question Get Answer Based on the article “The Death of English (LOL): In an experiment, the more adept children were at text messaging, the better they did in spelling and writing” by Lily Huang, answer the following questions in detail. Question 1 may be answered in bullet points. Questions 2-5 must be answered in a paragraph. For every question provide a deep analysis of the text using examples from the text. Q.1In your own words define the following words in reference to the text. Explicate the meaning of the word. Discuss what it means in the text. 1. Truant2. Phenomenon3. Pedagogues4. Linguists5. Vitriol Q.2 What does the phrase “raising​ the alarm” allude to? ​Who is raising the alarm and why​ ​?Provide detailed examples to support your claim. Q.3Who is the author of the Gr8​ Db8?​ Provide some brief background information about this individual (research). What is his stance on the topic of texting? Explain with examples from the text. Q.4What did the researchers discover about texting in their study? Explain what their experiments revealed using examples from the text. Q.5 Describe the rhetorical context of this article using all criteria and research (100-150 word)ReadingThe Death of English (LOL) Huang, Lily . Newsweek , International ed.; New York Vol. 152, Iss. 6, (Aug 11, 2008). ProQuest document link FULL TEXT The most hotly contested controversy sparked by the text-messaging phenomenon of the past eight years is over truant letters. Textese, a nascent dialect of English that subverts letters and numbers to produce ultra-concise words and sentiments, is horrifying language loyalists and pedagogues. And their fears are stoked by some staggering numbers: this year the world is on track to produce 2.3 trillion messages a nearly 20 percent increase from 2007 and almost 150 percent from 2000. The accompanying revenue for telephone companies is growing nearly as fast to an estimated $60 billion this year. In the English-speaking world, Britain alone generates well over 6 billion messages every month. People are communicating more and faster than ever, but some worry that, as textese drops consonants, vowels and punctuation and makes no distinction between letters and numbers, people will no longer know how we’re really supposed to communicate. Will text messaging produce generations of illiterates? Could this OMG be the death of the English language? Those raising the alarm aren’t linguists. They’re teachers who have had to red-pen some ridiculous practices in high-school papers and concerned citizens who believe it their moral duty to write grammar books. The latter can be quite prominent, like John Humphrys, a television broadcaster and household name in Britain, for whom texting is vandalism, and Lynne Truss, author of Eats, Shoots and Leaves, who actually enjoys texting so much she never abbreviates. Britain, one of the first countries where texting became a national habit, has also produced some of the most bitter anti-texting vitriol; textese, wrote John Sutherland in The Guardian, masks dyslexia. But linguists, if anyone is paying attention, have kept quiet on this score until now. In a new book, Britain’s most prolific linguist finally sets a few things straight. David Crystal’s Txtng: the Gr8 Db8 (Oxford ) makes two general points: that the language of texting is hardly as deviant as people think, and that texting actually makes young people better communicators, not worse. Crystal spells out the first point by marshaling real linguistic evidence. He breaks down the distinctive elements of texting language pictograms; initialisms, or acronyms; contractions, and others and points out similar examples in linguistic practice from the ancient Egyptians to 20th-century broadcasting. Shakespeare freely used elisions, novel syntax and several thousand made-up words (his own name was signed in six different ways). Even some common conventions are relatively newfangled: rules for using the oft-abused apostrophe were set only in the middle of the 19th century. The point is that tailored text predates the text message, so we might as well accept that ours is a language of vandals. Who even knows what p.m. stands for? ( Post meridiem, Latin for after midday, first recorded by a lazy delinquent in 1666.) Where the naysayers see destruction, Crystal sees growth. He believes in the same theory of evolution for language as some evolutionary biologists do for life: change isn’t gradual. Monumental developments interrupt periods of stasis, always as a result of crucial external developments. The American Revolution had much greater consequences for the English language than texting has had thus far. The resulting differences between American PDF GENERATED BY SEARCH.PROQUEST.COM Page 1 of 3 and British English, Crystal says, are more pronounced than the differences between, say, the language of newspapers and text messages. (Interestingly, there are hardly any differences between American and British texting.) As soon as linguists began to peer into the uproar over texting, researchers examined the effects of texting experimentally. The results disproved conventional wisdom: in one British experiment last year, children who texted and who wielded plenty of abbreviations scored higher on reading and vocabulary tests. In fact, the more adept they were at abbreviating, the better they did in spelling and writing. Far from being a means to getting around literacy, texting seems to give literacy a boost. The effect is similar to what happens when parents yak away to infants or read to toddlers: the more exposure children get to language, by whatever means, the more verbally skilled they become. Before you can write abbreviated forms effectively and play with them, you need to have a sense of how the sounds of your language relate to the letters, says Crystal. The same study also found the children with the highest scores to be the first to have gotten their own cell phones. Which doesn’t let the teenager who LOLs in a term paper off the hook but that’s not so much a question of language ability as of judgment. It, too, should go the way of all slang ever inappropriately used in a classroom rebuked with a red pen, not seized upon as a symptom of generational decline. Even if electronic communication engenders its own kind of carelessness, it’s no worse than the carelessness of academic jargon or journalistic shorthand. It certainly doesn’t engender stupidity. One look at the winners of text-poetry contests in Britain proves that the force behind texting is a penchant for innovation, not linguistic laziness. Electronic communication, Crystal says, has introduced that kind of creative spirit into spelling once again. That heathen Shakespeare would have been onboard. DETAILS Publication title: Newsweek, International ed.; New York Volume: 152 Issue: 6 Publication year: 2008 Publication date: Aug 11, 2008 Section: The Technologist Publisher: Newsweek Publishing LLC Place of publication: New York Country of publication: United States, New York Publication subject: Political Science ISSN: 01637053

Get Answer Prompt: What motivates Iago

In Shakespeare’s Othello, Iago is the main antagonist in the play as he works

Question Get Answer Prompt: What motivates Iago

In Shakespeare’s Othello, Iago is the main antagonist in the play as he works to destroy Othello and Desdemona’s relationship. Iago appears as a malevolent villain, whose motives remain shadowy with some of the reasons seeming preposterous, categorized as excuses for his actions. Iago is jealous of Othello for various reasons and he has other motivations such as jealousy and racial prejudices.Please give help me think of a better thesis

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