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When she was a student at Dartmouth, Maia Josebachvili wanted to go

Question When she was a student at Dartmouth, Maia Josebachvili wanted to go skydiving but couldn’t afford it. It occurred to her, however, that if she organized a whole group of paying customers for a skydiving excursion, she could go along for free. Thus was born the idea for Urban Escapes, which Josebachvili started in 2008 to offer excursions for New Yorkers looking for a weekend of white-water rafting, mountain climbing, or perhaps just apple picking. In looking around for a career, says Josebachvili in our video show, “I was most drawn to creating my own thing,” and as she adds elsewhere, Urban Escapes “started as a passion product. I mean, this is who I am. I spend my weekend’s mountain biking, rock climbing, and skydiving and then drinking beers at a brewery.” The fun factor is what also attracted Josebachvili’s eventual co-owner: “I was motivated to join Urban Escapes,” says Bram Levy, “purely because it seemed like something fun to do. I was really lucky to have the opportunity to try something new and fun and exciting, and if it didn’t work out,” he admits, “…I could always come back to the safe world” (which, for Levy, was “the consulting world”). About four months after starting out, 25-year-old Josebachvili had sought out 29-year-old Levy to help her expand the business, and by mid-2010, Urban Escapes had outlets in Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. The company soon added offices in San Francisco, Chicago, and Austin, Texas, bringing the workforce to a grand total of nine full-time employees (New York also required a full-time manager) and 50 part-timers to run weekend events. Levy admits that he was surprised by the eagerness of people to buy into the Urban Escapes concept. It wasn’t the money: “If someone is working for us solely to get rich,” he advises, “I’m guessing they made a poor choice.” From the beginning, however, “we had employees across the country working for us for virtually no income and no stability, merely because they enjoyed what we had to offer. And,” Levy hastens to point out, “they were having fun.” Since joining Urban Escapes, Levy has come to the conclusion that “when people are excited about something, they’ll do virtually anything.” Josebachvili agrees that it’s a matter of “passion,” but she’s also convinced that people gravitate toward Urban Escapes because it offers them an opportunity for satisfaction in their work lives: “It sounds so cheesy,” she says, “but I think it was really the passion and everyone’s belief that this was going to work” that allowed Urban Escapes to take off. Urban Escapes, he tells us, was “an idea that I truly believed in [and] thought could work,” and it offered him “a chance to run my own business again without a tremendous amount of financial or personal risk.” In fact, the most important decision that Josebachvili and Levy have made during their company’s brief existence was a major business decision. In 2010 (its last year as a stand-alone business), Urban Escapes attracted about 12,000 customers and took in $1 million in revenue. Living Social, which now has 60 million members worldwide and 4,900 employees, had revenues of $100 million in 2010 and $224 million in 2011.1-In your opinion, what causes job satisfaction among employees of Urban Escapes? 2-What type of values apply to Josebachvili and Levy? 3-In your opinion, is Urban Escapes a risky idea for the post-pandemic COVID-19?

A Socially Conscious Company
When she was a student at Dartmouth,

Question A Socially Conscious Company
When she was a student at Dartmouth, Maia Josebachvili wanted to go skydiving but couldn’t afford it. It occurred to her, however, that if she organized a whole group of paying customers for a skydiving excursion, she could go along for free. Thus was born the idea for Urban Escapes, which Josebachvili started in 2008 to offer excursions for New Yorkers looking for a weekend of white-water rafting, mountain climbing, or perhaps just apple picking. In looking around for a career, says Josebachvili in our video show, “I was most drawn to creating my own thing,” and as she adds elsewhere, Urban Escapes “started as a passion product. I mean, this is who I am. I spend my weekend’s mountain biking, rock climbing, and skydiving and then drinking beers at a brewery.” The fun factor is what also attracted Josebachvili’s eventual co-owner: “I was motivated to join Urban Escapes,” says Bram Levy, “purely because it seemed like something fun to do. I was really lucky to have the opportunity to try something new and fun and exciting, and if it didn’t work out,” he admits, “…I could always come back to the safe world” (which, for Levy, was “the consulting world”). About four months after starting out, 25-year-old Josebachvili had sought out 29-year-old Levy to help her expand the business, and by mid-2010, Urban Escapes had outlets in Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. The company soon added offices in San Francisco, Chicago, and Austin, Texas, bringing the workforce to a grand total of nine full-time employees (New York also required a full-time manager) and 50 part-timers to run weekend events. Levy admits that he was surprised by the eagerness of people to buy into the Urban Escapes concept. It wasn’t the money: “If someone is working for us solely to get rich,” he advises, “I’m guessing they made a poor choice.” From the beginning, however, “we had employees across the country working for us for virtually no income and no stability, merely because they enjoyed what we had to offer. And,” Levy hastens to point out, “they were having fun.” Since joining Urban Escapes, Levy has come to the conclusion that “when people are excited about something, they’ll do virtually anything.” Josebachvili agrees that it’s a matter of “passion,” but she’s also convinced that people gravitate toward Urban Escapes because it offers them an opportunity for satisfaction in their work lives: “It sounds so cheesy,” she says, “but I think it was really the passion and everyone’s belief that this was going to work” that allowed Urban Escapes to take off. Urban Escapes, he tells us, was “an idea that I truly believed in [and] thought could work,” and it offered him “a chance to run my own business again without a tremendous amount of financial or personal risk.” In fact, the most important decision that Josebachvili and Levy have made during their company’s brief existence was a major business decision. In 2010 (its last year as a stand-alone business), Urban Escapes attracted about 12,000 customers and took in $1 million in revenue. Living Social, which now has 60 million members worldwide and 4,900 employees, had revenues of $100 million in 2010 and $224 million in 2011.1-In your opinion, what causes job satisfaction among employees of Urban Escapes? 2-What type of values apply to Josebachvili and Levy? 3-In your opinion, is Urban Escapes a risky idea for the post-pandemic COVID-19?

Using the scenario below Make a 12-month master schedule using Excel.

Question Using the scenario below Make a 12-month master schedule using Excel. Make a MRP schedule that supports the master schedule using Excel.Jones Company now needs to develop a master schedule and an MRP schedule based on the customer demand forecast you developed for the X52 power supply back in Assignment 1. They’ve asked for your assistance. Use this forecast: JAN THROUGH APRIL 2,700 per month; MAY THROUGH AUGUST 3,000 per month; SEPTEMBER THROUGH DECEMBER 3,300 per month. Lot sizes for X52 are 3,000 and to produce one X52, you need two units of 23A, one unit of 46B, and three units of 29C. You currently have 6,000 units of 23A in stock, 4,000 of 46B and 9,000 of 29C. Lead time to buy each of these three components is one month.

Kellam Images prints snack food bags on long rolls of plastic film.

ManagementQuestion Kellam Images prints snack food bags on long rolls of plastic film. The plant operates 250 days a year. The daily production rate is 6000 bags, and the daily demand is 3500 bags. The cost to set up the design for printing is $300. The holding cost is estimated at 2 cents per bag. (20 pts)a. What is the recommended production lot size?b. Number of production runs per yearc. Cycle timed. If there is a five-day lead time to set up the line, what is the recommended reorder point?e. What is the total annual cost?

Analyze how civil rights, gender or race was dealt with in film of

Question Analyze how civil rights, gender or race was dealt with in film of the 1960s. Give an example of a film from this period (list one from the book if you personally haven’t seen one) and describe how it represents this politic. Was this a positive or negative image? How about films today–do you think they do better, worse or the same job of representing this? Give an example and explain

Get Answer Write detailed analysis of Reaganite entertainment. Explain how Reagan’s on-screen persona played into his campaign for America.

Question Get Answer Write detailed analysis of Reaganite entertainment. Explain how Reagan’s on-screen persona played into his campaign for America. Focus on at least TWO themes that films during this time explore, and give examples of films that fit into these categories. What was the backlash? List some examples. Have you ever seen any of these films? Has you opinion of them changed after reading this chapter?

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