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What would you say is a definition of “myth”?What is

Question What would you say is a definition of “myth”?

What is a characteristic of the Greek gods that is distinctly different from the Judeo-Christian-Islamic conception of God? Explain.From where does Hesiod get his information about which he sings? What are they like?What was the first thing created? Name 3 things Ge creates on her own.Why is the relationship between father and child not always a strong one among the early generations of gods?Why was woman created? What was she created to LOOK like and why?Why, according to Hesiod, are women a good punishment for man (i.e. What do they do that is so bad?)?Describe the monster Typhoeus. How was it defeated? What did Zeus do to set the gods in order?

I’m working on a paper about Mere Christianity and there’s a part

Question Get Answer I’m working on a paper about Mere Christianity and there’s a part where C.S. Lewis is talking about why it’s important to follow God and listen to his prescriptions and it’s not because we owe him for giving him our lives and creating the world because that is something that we can never pay him back for. Do you know what chapter that is in?

Identify and explain the significance of the following passage:
“…she began to stand around the gate and expect things. What

Question Identify and explain the significance of the following passage:
“…she began to stand around the gate and expect things. What things? She didn’t know exactly. Her breath was gusty and short. She knew things that nobody ever told her. For instance, the words of the trees and the wind. …She knew the world was a stallion rolling in the blue pasture of ether. She knew that God tore down the old world every evening and built a new one by sun-up. It was wonderful to see it take form with the sun and emerge from the gray dust of its making. “

The tragedies of Medea and Hippolytus are fantastic examples of vastly

Language and CultureQuestion The tragedies of Medea and Hippolytus are fantastic examples of vastly differing views on misogyny/ woman’s place depending on your vantage point. This seems to be the tragic fate of man that we have difficulty seeing things from another’s shoes. Knowing what we know now, how might the ancient Greeks have solved this issue- in a peaceful way? OR what is an example of this dichotomy today and how might a peaceful resolution be reached?

Prompt 1:
Evelyn White addresses her fears of the wilderness and

Question Get Answer Prompt 1:
Evelyn White addresses her fears of the wilderness and what it represents to her. After her experience with racial discrimination when trying to rent a rowboat, White decides that in order to “contain [her] fears” she would have “to revisit the encounter and to reexamine [her] childhood wounds” (1066). Consider the paragraph on pg. 1066 in which she recalls not only her personal experience but also her ancestral experience. -Why must White confront both these historical wounds and her personal experience? In what ways does her reexamination allow her to move past her fears? -Does the prospect of being out in the wilderness raise any fears for you? If so, what fears would being in the wild raise for you, and what might be the source of that fear? If not, why are you not afraid of being in the wild, and what might be the source of your comfort in that environment?Prompt 2:Early in Berry’s essay, he wakes after his first night of camping in the wild to say, “The dawn comes slow and cold…. I have not slept well, and I waken without much interest in the day” (723). Compare this to the morning after Berry’s second night in the woods, when he says, “Soon after dark I go to bed, and I sleep well. I wake long before dawn. The air is warm and I feel rested and wide awake” (728). -How do we account for these vastly different experiences of awakening to a new day in the woods? What has happened in the span of 24 hours that leads Berry to view and experience his environment in a completely different way? -Have you had a similar experience in which you experience the same environment in different ways? If yes, how do you account for the differences in your experience? If not, why might you be able to experience your environment in a consistent manner

While our definitions of nature and wilderness might vary, we’ve all

Question While our definitions of nature and wilderness might vary, we’ve all had some sort of experience in the natural world. This can include anything from a picnic at your neighborhood park, a hike in the mountains, getting stung by a bee on the playground, camping with friends, watching a tree grow over time in your yard, kayaking in the Salish Sea…you get the idea: there are many ways you can define having an experience in the natural world. As a way to get to know your teammates, this activity asks you to share with your group one particular experience you’ve had in the natural world. Choose one particularly memorable and vivid experience you’ve had in the natural world, and describe it for your group in as much detail as possible. -Where were you? -When did this occur? -What made this a memorable experience? -What made it a good, or bad, experience? -Would you want to do something like this again? Why or why not?

Work through the steps below to start planning your first Analysis Essay, which is due at the beginning of Module

Work through the steps below to start planning your first Analysis Essay, which is due at the beginning of Module 5. The more you invest now in working through possible ideas for your essay, the more chances you’ll have to refine these ideas into an effective paper.NOTE: The worksheet assignment is required and counts for 10% of your Paper 1 grade. Instructors will only give feedback on the proposal section.We’re treating this assignment like a pre-writing exercise and a chance for you to start exploring the text and ideas that you’ll write about in your essay. Please work through the steps thoughtfully, and know that we fully expect that you’ll continue to revise and rethink what you submit here. We also highly recommend coming to our virtual office hours to discuss your essay plans. (A Zoom meeting to discuss your paper can count as your one required office hours visit. Remember that you’re required to visit an instructor’s office hours before the end of Week 6.)Pre-Writing Worksheet Steps (Instructors will not provide comments on this section)Open a Word Doc.Choose from the possible paper topics below or create a topic of your own.Choose the text you’ll write about to explore this topic. (Choose one text from Modules 1-4, including Teju Cole’s novel Open City. It is possible to write about two texts, but you will need to first check with your instructor to make sure that the paper you’re proposing is doable within the space of this assignment.) Choose two passages from the text that you see as related to your topic. Type up the passages and include in-text citations in MLA Style. (Here’s an online citation guide (Links to an external site.)) (Links to an external site.)Note that the passages you include in this section should be direct quotes from the text that add something to the way you’re thinking about your paper topic.Choose one of the two passages, and draft a paragraph that analyzes it closely. Remember to practice the kind of close reading we’ve highlighted in our course; read closely, identify relevant details in the passage, and explore what these details might mean and how they go about producing this meaning or meanings. If it helps, think of this step as an opportunity to draft a body paragraph that you’ll revise and develop further in your Analysis Essay.Proposal Steps (Instructors will provide comments on this section)Reflecting on the ideas that emerged while you were completing your Pre-Writing Worksheet, write one or two sentences about the larger argument that you’d like to explore in your paper (i.e., working thesis statement). Based on your initial close reading of one passage, what do you think is the larger argument you’d like to make about this text in your essay? Note that you’re writing a literary analysis paper, so your argument should be a claim about the text that you can support and develop with concrete evidence from the text you’ve chosen. Take care to avoid broad or generalizing claims, and keep in mind that your argument will likely change as you continue to work closely with textual evidence and develop your paper. A good interpretive argument will become more nuanced as you work through close reading — you might even end up changing your argument entirely after you more thoroughly analyze the evidence that you find in the text. Changing and developing your thesis is often a great idea, as long as you’re making the paper’s central argument more grounded in direct evidence from the text and careful analysis.List the key passages from the text that you plan to analyze in your paper. Include a minimum of two passages in your list, and for each passage, provide a brief description of what’s happening in the passage and why you think it relates to your working thesis statement.Submit your assignment as a Word Doc on bCourses.Remember that your instructors will only provide feedback on your proposed argument/working thesis statement and evidence. Other parts of this assignment are designed to help you develop a nuanced, analytical argument for your proposal.Possible Paper TopicsNOTE: No matter which topic you invent or choose from below, you’re writing a paper that analyzes a text. Your paper should not be about a general theme or try to universalize.Below are some possible topics; you aren’t required to write about any of these. The list is intended to help you identify topics we’ve explored in class, and it also includes topics that we haven’t had time to discuss but could interest you. We believe that the best papers happen when students are genuinely invested in their paper topic, so please choose a paper topic that interests you.If you choose from the topics below, remember that you need to plan on discussing the topic in relationship to a text we’ve read.Problems of NYC as immigrant dreamscapeNYC as a “Renaissance” space—a space of renewal or rebirth(In)visibility and the powers of seeing in Ralph Ellison’s prologue to Invisible ManRepresenting Manhattan as indigenous spaceDreams and nightmares in Invisible ManSound and listening in “Sonny’s Blues”Harlem as both a “nowhere” and a “somewhere”The Great Migration as refugee movement (You could write about this topic in relationship to J. Lawrence’s Migration Series)Race and social (im)mobility in Passingor Open CityTensions between attraction and repulsion; the question of sexual passing in Nella Larsen’s novelAnonymity or semi-anonymity in the city street vs. domestic spacePersonal memory and its connection to the reliability of the senses, especially sight Monuments and historical sites in Open CityReading List:Module 1:”The New Colossus,” Emma Lazarus (Links to an external site.)”The Buttonhook,” Mary Jo Salter (Links to an external site.)”How I Found America,”

Please address the following:Compose a literacy narrative in which you introduce yourself as a reader and a writer. For example,

Please address the following:Compose a literacy narrative in which you introduce yourself as a reader and a writer. For example, you could discuss the challenges you face as a new student to literature and what your fears and hopes are for the course. You could also explore how your reading and/or writing experiences have been important to your life.Essays must be in MLA formatEssays should be a minimum of 750 words

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