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What is happiness? Aristotle argues that pleasure is a factor, but

Question What is happiness? Aristotle argues that pleasure is a factor, but not a main one, for people can derive pleasure from base, ignoble, and cruel acts. It is important, therefore, to cultivate virtue, for the good person takes pleasure in acting virtuously and hates things that are against virtue. People who are raised to become habituated to practicing virtue and hating vice develop good character, and good character is necessary for happiness. People who have not developed good character are incapable of being persuaded by ethical/philosophical arguments that they should take pleasure in virtue instead of vice. Take some of Aristotle’s arguments and apply them to your idea of happiness. What are the ingredients and characteristics of happiness, and what should a person do in order to attain it?

Objective: To help learn the truth functions of any compound propositional statement.

Question Get Answer Objective: To help learn the truth functions of any compound propositional statement. Fact: The last photo taken of all four Beatles was in 1969.Thus: we know the simple statement “the last photo taken of all four Beatles together was in 1969” is True. Let’s assign “L” to symbolize this simple statement. In this way, L has a truth-value of being True.But if I were to negate a simple statement that we know to be True, then the truth-value of the negated simple statement would be False. Thus, truth-value of ~L is in fact False.In the end, the funny thing here is that many statements, simple or compound, that we make throughout the day can actually be assigned a truth-value at a certain point. Many statements can be quantified as being true or false. In this section, these are the only statements that we will be addressing, viz., statements that we already know to be true or false in order to ascertain the truth-value of the compound statement of which the simple statement is a part.For this exercise, the truth-values will be given to you as part of the original problem.Statements with Assigned Truth ValuesFor the following problems, assume these given truth-valuesA, B, C are TrueX, Y, Z are FalseSolve1. A ѵ ~Za) Replace each statement with the given assigned truth-values and rewrite the problem with the assigned truth-valuesb) Using the truth-table, solve for the truth-value of the compound statement

Imagine you’re a doctor. A 15-year-old girl who recently emigrated

Question Imagine you’re a doctor. A 15-year-old girl who recently emigrated from Somalia and an 48-year-old EM doctor, originally from NYC, are both infected with the coronavirus. Both need an oxygen mask. But there’s only one. Who would you treat? Such life-and-death decisions are called triage, an ethical dilemma, another face of COVID-19. The 15-year old has other health problems that complicate treatment. The 48-year-old is an excellent EM doctor and otherwise healthy, but significantly older than the 15-year old who expressed a strong interest in becoming an actress and model. Use one of the moral theories to illustrate some important points in this decision and the challenges of invoking triage in a medical emergency situation with limited resources.

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Share your thoughts on your worldview of family, society, and political philosophy looking at it through the

PhilosophyQuestion Get Answer

Share your thoughts on your worldview of family, society, and political philosophy looking at it through the lens of the philosophers( Plato, Aristotle, St. Aquinas) as discussed in the links shared. Remember, your personal philosophy is right for you, you do not have to agree with these scholars or anyone else in life. Sample questions you may discuss (but you can come up with your own):• How do I see Plato’s philosophy in The Republic in the society where I live?• I think Aristotle/Plato/St. Aquinas most represents my town/family because…• Explain, compare, and contrast your personal philosophy with that of one of these men.• St. Thomas was wrong because… (same for Plato and Aristotle)• Summarize each of the three philosophers’ position and explain how you see each of them around you in different ways.Come up with your own topic based on one, two, or all these men. Do not necessarily do biography.Burnyeat, M.F. (1997). Culture and Society in Plato’s Republic. The Tanner Lectures on Human Values. Harvard University. Available at https://tannerlectures.utah.edu/_documents/a-to-z/b/Burnyeat99.pdfRead the entire section in Culture and Society in Plato’s Republic called “A Tale of Two Cities” starting on page 228 through page 236. BURNYEAT] Culture and Society in Republic sense-based thinking cultivated by lovers of sights and sounds who enthusiastically rush around the countryside to view the plays put on at the Rural Dionysia, “as if they had farmed out their ears to listen to every chorus in the land” (475d) ; on the other side, the philosophical mode of thinking cultivated by those who are awake to the distinction between the many beautiful sights and sounds and the single Form, Beauty itself. When Socrates speaks of thought ( 8 ~ d v o ~ a ) in this passage, he clearly has in view not isolated, occurrent thoughts (“What a pretty picture that is!”), but a style of thinking which pervades one’s life and structures one’s outlook on the world. Book X confirms what we should have suspected all along, that sense-based thinking is at work in each and every embodied soul. Hence Plato’s concern to make sure that only grace- ful appearances meet our eyes, only the appropriate kinds of musi- cal poetry come to our ears. He must make the whole culture ideal. Not only because, as I said just now, all of it influences character, but also because of the way it does this: by a gradual, often un- noticed accumulation of images that come in at a level below, and relatively independent of, reason’s activities of judgment, evalua- tion, and belief-formation. It is easy for a modern reader to misunderstand this, just as it is easy to mistake Plato’s motivational division for the now fa- miliar distinction between reason and desire. In the divided soul reason has desires and pleasures of its own, while appetite has con- ceptions of what is pleasurable and can reason how to get it; the middle, spirited part is devoted to honour and has a network of beliefs about what that requires. What distinguishes reason from The Tanner Lectures on Human Values the other motivational parts is its concern for the overall, long- term good in one’s life; appetite just longs for that drink, regard- less of consequences. Similarly, in the cognitive division, reason has no monopoly on judgment, evaluation, and belief-formation. Its specialty, as the part bent on knowing the truth of things in every sphere (58lb), is to weigh up all the evidence, so that we are not ruled by misleading appearances (602d) ; it ensures that we are not often taken in by objects that look small far away. But for Plato the misleading appearance already involves judgment.22 Throughout the Republic perception is treated as a judgment- maker independent of reason, but much less reflective.23 A modern Idealist philosopher wrote: ” ‘Sense-perception’ is a form of ‘knowl- edge,’ a ‘cognizant experience,’ in which the mind thinks sensu- ously. There is ‘thought’ in sense-perception, but not thought free and explicit -not ‘thought’ which the percipient controls, or of which he is even aware as ‘thought.’ “24 With much of this Plato could agree. Especially the last clause. A TALE OF Two CITIES But let us stay a while longer with material culture. If there is a problem about ensuring it is graceful rather than ugly, the exis- tence of such a problem is a kind of luxury. A society faced with a choice in the matter must have resources beyond those needed for survival. As Aristotle will put it (Politics I 1, 1252b 29-30), it is a society which, having come into existence for the sake of life, now exists for the sake of the good life. To mark this distinc- tion Socrates describes two cities: the first confined to the economic divisions, for it desires both truth and the good; the lower parts are different in the two cases, identified by the ways they differ from reason. 22 Explicitly stated at 602e-3a and more formally theorized in Plato’s Sophist (263d-64b). 23 See especially 523a-25a. 24 Harold H. Joachim, Logical Studies (Oxford 1948, from lectures given in 1927-35), p. 83 (italics mine). The context is an attack on the Empiricist search for a datum in sense-perception, The next page cites Rep. 523a-25a. [BURNYEAT] Culture and Society in Republic necessities of city life in the fifth century B.C., the second enjoy- ing all the pleasant “extras” of ancient Greek civilization -in- cluding that wonderful architecture, which Socrates speaks of as “houses and clothing beyond the requirements of necessity” (373a 5-6).26 And to make the contrast vivid, he tells us (with a good deal of irony) how in each city -the primitive city at subsistence level and the “luxurious” city with a surplus -the citizens will enjoy the high point of ancient social life, the feast or communal meal. We start with the uncouth simplicity of the first city: “For their nourishment they will prepare barley-meal and wheat flour: the latter to bake, the other to knead. The barley- cakes and wheaten loaves they will throw on some rushes or fresh leaves and, reclining on beds {KU7UKXLV

“Life Magazine Identifies the New Teenage Market,” 1959

1. How

Question Get Answer “Life Magazine Identifies the New Teenage Market,” 1959

1. How does the article describe the teen generation as compared to their “Depression-bred parents?” 2.What kinds of things does Suzie Slattery have as a seventeen year-old girl? What does the article seem to imply about her by describing the things she has?3.Based on this article what does this generation seem to value most?

Get Answer Constructivism and Epistemological Relativism: Why, for Kant, are neither the empiricists nor the rationalists able to explain

Question Get Answer Constructivism and Epistemological Relativism: Why, for Kant, are neither the empiricists nor the rationalists able to explain how we are able to have knowledge? In what way, if any, does epistemological relativism build on constructivism? Ultimately, does either constructivism or epistemological relativism provide an adequate theory of knowledge?

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Ethical Dilemma 4: The Terrorist
A terrorist implanted bombs in three locations. You’re a bomb-diffusion specialist

Question Get Answer Question 1

Ethical Dilemma 4: The Terrorist
A terrorist implanted bombs in three locations. You’re a bomb-diffusion specialist located at the center of these three locations. They’re timed to go off at the same time. No other bomb-diffusion experts are within the area, and it would take over 1 hour for others to arrive. You receive a phone call from the terrorist, whom discloses these locations to you and that they are set to go off in 30 minutes. Which location will you decide to diffuse and why? It is impossible to diffuse the remaining locations.Location 1: The MallConsequence: Many people pass through this mall on a daily basis including many families with their children. 5,000 – 6,000 people are estimated to die and hundreds more injured if the bomb goes off. There will be major panic, chaos, and severe traffic once the security office begins the evacuation process. Hundreds more are expected to die or be injured in the surrounding residential and business areas.Location 2: Children’s HospitalConsequence: The hospital consists of over 2,000 inpatients and several hundreds of outpatients a day. There is not enough time to evacuate everyone. 500 – 1,000 patients may potentially die and hundreds will be injured. The bomb will also cause major structural damage or even cause the entire hospital to collapse. Nearby are several retirement homes consisting of 1,000 residents. There is also not enough time to evacuate everyone to a safe distance. Hundreds of these people are also expected to die or be severely injured.Location 3: Business Conference at the Hilton HotelThe Hilton, on this day, is holding a major conference with 20 high level diplomats from our government as well as several other governments and also 20 high profile business executives. Among them are President Trump, Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Mark Zuckerberg. Structural damage to the hotel and surrounding buildings in this busy part of the city will surely cause some of these diplomats and business executives to die and the death or injury of over 1,000 important attendees. There will be chaos and major traffic for several city blocks once the evacuation process begins.

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