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Is the following a descriptive statement, normative statement, or not a statement? Philosophy Assignment Help

Question Is the following a descriptive statement, normative statement, or not a statement? 1)There is no spoon. – from The Matrix (1999) 2) To infinity and beyond! – from Toy Story (1995) 3)You can’t handle the truth! – from A Few Good Men (1992)4)There’s no crying in baseball! – from A League of Their Own (1992)5)Honey, where’s my super suit? – from The Incredibles (2004)6)That’ll do, pig. That’ll do. – from Babe (1995)7)The flower that blooms in adversity is the most rare and beautiful of all. – from Mulan (1998)

Can you give the justification for each step in the derivation below? Ten bonus points if you get them all!

Question Get Answer Can you give the justification for each step in the derivation below? Ten bonus points if you get them all! N.B. Because the entire discussion becomes visible after posting, I can only award the bonus to *unedited* posts. It is false that some non-A are not non-B. Therefore [explain!], all non-A are non-B. Therefore [explain!], all B are A. Therefore [explain!], it’s false that no B are A. Therefore [explain!], some B are A. Therefore [explain!], some A are B.

-Apply Jeremy Bentham’s egoistic hook to a current social issue.

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-Apply Jeremy Bentham’s egoistic hook to a current social issue. – How does John Stuart Mill account for the rarity of higher pleasures in so many lives? -Explain the deterministic basic of Marxian materialism. -Explain the importance of class consciousness and class struggle to Marxism. What role does consciousness play in species-life, according to Marx? -Are Marx’s two categories of social class (the bourgeoisie and the proletariat) adequate to describe today’s economic conflicts? Are there additional social classes that Marx does not address, and if so, what are they?

Contrast Plato with Aristotle and decide whom you agree with more

PhilosophyQuestion Get Answer Contrast Plato with Aristotle and decide whom you agree with more (and why) and secondly evaluate Saint Thomas Aquinas’ view of the root of good society.Burnyeat, M.F. (1997). Culture and Society in Plato’s Republic. The Tanner Lectures on Human Values. Harvard University. Available at https://tannerlectures.utah.edu/_documents/a-to-z/b/Burnyeat99.pdf Read the entire section in Culture and Society in Plato’s Republic called “A Tale of Two Cities” starting on page 228 through page 236. Levin, M. (2012). Ameritopia: The Unmaking of America. NY: Simon and Schuster, Inc. Available at http://academic.udayton.edu/LawrenceUlrich/Leadership370/Plato’s Republic and The Perfect Society.pdfNow read the free online excerpt from Mark Levin’s Ameritopia, Chapter 2, on pages 23-36.Zarri, J. (1948). Aristotle’s Theory of the Origin of State. Oxbridge Essays. Available at http://www.scholardarity.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Aristotles-Theory-of-the-Origin-of-the-State-DRAFT-2-PDF.pdfSaint Thomas Aquinas(n.d). http://www.crf-usa.org/bill-of-rights-in-action/bria-22-4-c-st-thomas-aquinas-natural-law-and-the-common-goodA TALE OF Two CITIES But let us stay a while longer with material culture. If there is a problem about ensuring it is graceful rather than ugly, the exis- tence of such a problem is a kind of luxury. A society faced with a choice in the matter must have resources beyond those needed for survival. As Aristotle will put it (Politics I 1, 1252b 29-30), it is a society which, having come into existence for the sake of life, now exists for the sake of the good life. To mark this distinc- tion Socrates describes two cities: the first confined to the economic divisions, for it desires both truth and the good; the lower parts are different in the two cases, identified by the ways they differ from reason. 22 Explicitly stated at 602e-3a and more formally theorized in Plato’s Sophist (263d-64b). 23 See especially 523a-25a. 24 Harold H. Joachim, Logical Studies (Oxford 1948, from lectures given in 1927-35), p. 83 (italics mine). The context is an attack on the Empiricist search for a datum in sense-perception, The next page cites Rep. 523a-25a. [BURNYEAT] Culture and Society in Republic necessities of city life in the fifth century B.C., the second enjoy- ing all the pleasant “extras” of ancient Greek civilization -in- cluding that wonderful architecture, which Socrates speaks of as “houses and clothing beyond the requirements of necessity” (373a 5-6).26 And to make the contrast vivid, he tells us (with a good deal of irony) how in each city -the primitive city at subsistence level and the “luxurious” city with a surplus -the citizens will enjoy the high point of ancient social life, the feast or communal meal. We start with the uncouth simplicity of the first city: “For their nourishment they will prepare barley-meal and wheat flour: the latter to bake, the other to knead. The barley- cakes and wheaten loaves they will throw on some rushes or fresh leaves and, reclining on beds {KU7UKXLV

Here’s a question for you: competition may put a check on planned obsolescence. Competition among businesses offering similar products

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Here’s a question for you: competition may put a check on planned obsolescence. Competition among businesses offering similar products leads to greater variety, lower prices, and higher quality. But when only one company manufactures a product over which they have total control, the opposite may occur. So the question: if too few companies offering a similar product leads to consumerism and planned obsolescence, what might be the right number of companies needed to ensure higher, longer lasting quality? And which of the three of the ethical theories (deontology, utilitarianism, virtue ethics) would focus best on what the rules of fair competition should be?

Leviticus and Paul’s Letter to the Romans discuss the various ways

Question Get Answer Leviticus and Paul’s Letter to the Romans discuss the various ways human sexual activity may deviate from this model and they condemn these deviations in various ways. In your post, analyze the discussions in both Leviticus and Paul in the following way: identify which sexual acts deviate from the model established in Genesis. Then identify the particular condemnations assigned to these acts. In particular, notes which acts are labelled ‘abomination,’ perversion,’ and ‘unnatural.’PHIL225 – Philosophy of Love

1. Summarize the four meanings of parrhesia as explained in the first

Question Get Answer 1. Summarize the four meanings of parrhesia as explained in the first section of the Foucault lecture (p. 1-5). After summarizing the meaning of parrhesia, explain a time when you have had to play the role of a parrhesiastes (aka someone who speaks truth to power) OR if you have seen/heard someone else play this role.2. Looking at the second section of the Foucault lecture, (p. 6-10) explain the “crisis” of democracy in the face of parrhesia. To answer this, you will need to explain both the positive and negative definitions of parrhesia, by explaining the difference between a “good” and a “bad” orator. Give an example of each kind of parrhesia (one good example one bad example).

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